The Best Cat Foods for Older Cats with Bad Teeth

We take reviews seriously. This article has product links we may be compensated for as an affiliate, at no extra cost to you.

After performing a ton of market research (and buying different foods for a senior cat), I’ve found Sheba Perfect Portions Cuts in Gravy to be the best cat food for older cats with bad teeth.

Best Overall
Sheba Perfect Portions Cuts in Gravy
9.4
  • Soft cut pate for easy eating
  • Made with real protein
  • No grain, corn, wheat, soy, artificial flavors, or preservatives
  • High-quality ingredients, essential vitamins, and minerals
  • Variety of flavors (chicken, turkey, and tuna)

It started when my friend’s older cat was having trouble eating because of dental issues. Pepper is a dignified lady at 12 years old, and was getting so thin.

Since I’ve helped my own cat through oral-dental issues and not eating, I started thinking about how to help senior cats like Pepper. And what my Maine Coon would need if her gingiva or stomatitis returned. And what I would do is feed Sheba.

Best Cat Foods for Older Cats with Bad Teeth
Photo via Thomas | (CC BY-SA 2.0)

But every cat is different. That’s why I’ve included the best cat foods for older cats with bad teeth for a variety of categories.

These are the some of products reviewed in this article (not all shown).

Royal Canin Aging 12+
RUNNER UP

Royal Canin Aging 12+

  • Soft Texture, Easy to Eat
  • Chicken Flavor
  • 50.00% min Protein By Dry Matter Basis
  • No Prescription Required
I AND LOVE AND YOU Canned & Wet
BEST PREMIUM

I AND LOVE AND YOU Canned & Wet

  • Chicken, Beef, Cod, Turkey, Salmon, Rabbit flavors
  • Soft Texture, Easy to Eat
  • 43.18% min Protein by Dry Matter Basis
  • No Prescription Required
Purina Pro Plan Prime Plus Senior 7+
BEST BUDGET

Purina Pro Plan Prime Plus Senior 7+

  • Chkn, Chkn & Beef, Ocean Whitefish & Salmon, Salmon & Tuna, Turkey & Giblets Flavors
  • Soft Texture, Easily Digestible
  • 40.91% min Protein By Dry Matter Basis
  • No Prescription Required
Blue Buffalo Basics Limited Ingredient Diet
BEST DRY

Blue Buffalo Basics Limited Ingredient Diet

  • Turkey & Potato Flavors
  • Limited Ingredient, Digestive Support
  • 30.77% min Protein By Dry Matter Basis
  • No Prescription Required
Hill's Science Diet Dry, Oral Care
BEST ORAL CARE

Hill's Science Diet Dry, Oral Care

  • Chicken Flavor
  • Dental Care
  • 32.22% min Protein By Dry Matter Basis
  • No Prescription Required

Overall Best Wet Cat Food for Older Cats with Bad Teeth

Sheba Perfect Portions Cuts in Gravy
8.25
  • Soft cut pate for easy eating
  • Made with real protein
  • No grain, corn, wheat, soy, artificial flavors, or preservatives
  • High-quality ingredients, essential vitamins, and minerals
  • Variety of flavors (chicken, turkey, and tuna)
  • First 5 ingredients: Water, Chicken, Poultry Liver, Animal Plasma, Tapioca Starch
  • Guaranteed analysis: 7% crude protein, 2.5% crude fat, 1.5% crude fiber, 84% moisture, 0.06% Taurine
  • Life stage: Senior, Adult, Kitten

Sheba Perfect Portions Cuts in Gravy is our overall best cat food for older cats with bad teeth because compared to comparable priced wet foods, this one contains more quality ingredients and less filler.

Plus, the ultimate compliment is that senior cats actually prefer this stuff!

Why Sheba is Unique – Good Texture for Older Cats

Another thing to note is the unique texture – cuts of pate in gravy that makes it suitable for trouble chewing and eating.

Species Appropriate Protein and Nutrient Rich

With 7% crude protein, 2.5% crude fat, 1.5% crude fiber, and 84% moisture, this wet cat food has a species specific ratio of protein and fat plus a large amount of hydration.

Each of the three flavors is made with real protein in the form of chicken, poultry liver, salmon, and turkey, with no byproducts. There’a also vitamins, taurine, minerals, and fish oil.

Animal plasma is included as a source of protein. Present in animal blood and natural diets, animal plasma increases digestibility, a plus for senior cats.

Protein content is lower than some wet foods, but the quality of the real protein makes up for it. For example, my runner up pick, Royal Canin Aging 12+ Wet Cat Food, is 9% crude protein by volume. However, a big part of that are pork by-products.

Low Filler and Easy to Digest

Sheba Perfect Portions does not have any grain, wheat, soy, corn, artificial preservatives and flavors. This definitely makes it easy to digest! Keep in mind though, tapioca starch is in the ingredients.

So Sheba ranks well by every metric of what makes a great wet food for old cats. Most importantly, cat owners report that even their most finicky senior cats love the tastes in this variety pack.

They also say the portion packaging is ideal as cats eat the entire portion, with no waste.

Rating Breakdown:

  • Senior Cat Formulated: 7/10
  • Ingredient Quality: 8/10
  • Flavor Variety: 8/10
  • Price: 10/10
  • Overall Score: 8.25

What We Liked:

  • Soft pate in gravy for easy eating
  • Made with real proteins
  • No grain, corn, wheat, soy, artificial flavors, or preservatives
  • High-quality ingredients, essential vitamins, and minerals
  • Variety of flavors (chicken, turkey, and tuna)

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Some cat owners say it was too rich for their cat

Runner Up Cat Food for Older Cats with Teeth Problems

Royal Canin Aging 12+
7.25
  • Soft Texture, Easy to Eat
  • Chicken Flavor
  • 50.00% min Protein By Dry Matter Basis
  • No Prescription Required
  • First 5 ingredients: Water, pork by-products, pork liver, chicken, chicken liver
  • Guaranteed analysis: 9% crude protein, 2.5% crude fat, 1.8% crude fiber, 82% moisture
  • Life stage: Senior, Adult, Kitten

Royal Canin is a popular international pet food brand, and are well-known for the research and science behind their formulations.

They have a large range of pet food for different nutritional needs like this one for senior felines, and it totally performs like one of best cat foods for older cats with teeth problems, meeting our criteria.

Easy to Eat and Palatable

To start, the texture is right. Royal Canin Aging 12+ wet cat food is such a stellar performer for cats with teeth pain because they can easily lap the gravy, pick up the loaf with their teeth (or lips if the cat is toothless), or both.

The Thin Slices texture was a good pick in the past for teeth or gum pain, but recently it’s become more rubbery. I recommend the loaf.

Protein Content

This soft-textured food has a specifies specific appropriate nutrient mix of 9% crude protein, 2.5% crude fat, 1.8% crude fiber, and 82% moisture. Compared to Sheba, my top pick, this has higher protein % by volume.

A portion of this protein does come from by-products though. I’m not the biggest fan, but many elderly cat care takers say their cats love this wet food, and it digests easily.

About by-products: Royal Canin says that it has a nutrient-first approach rather than an individual ingredient approach.

This means they will employ both raw materials like whole meat, and by-products meant for animal consumption to provide the most appropriate diet for the cat or dog’s lifestyle or condition.

Nutrients and Minerals

The recipe also includes essential omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, vitamins, fish oil, and trace minerals. It does contain wheat flour, so cats with grain allergies should not partake.

Glucosamine and chondroitin are this food too to protect the joints and cartilage of your cat. Like humans, your cat’s joints and cartilage become more brittle over the years.

Low Phosphorous for Kidney Care

Chronic Kidney Disease is also common in senior cats, and veterinarians recommend a low phosphorous diet as prevention.

The phosphorous content in Royal Canin Aging 12+ is 1.15 g/1000 cal, which stands out vs other wet cat foods. So if your cat is on low protein diet for kidney health, this is definitely the top choice!

Rating Breakdown:

  • Senior Cat Formulated: 10/10
  • Ingredient Quality: 7/10
  • Flavor Variety: 5/10
  • Price: 7/10
  • Overall Score: 7.25

What We Liked:

  • Easy to eat soft loaf in gravy
  • Omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins, and some minerals
  • Glucosamine and chondroitin
  • Low phosphorous
  • Easy-open cans

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Contains wheat flour and meat by-products

Premium Pick – Cat Food for Senior Cats with Bad Teeth

I AND LOVE AND YOU Canned & Wet
7.75
  • Chicken, Beef, Cod, Turkey, Salmon, Rabbit flavors
  • Soft Texture, Easy to Eat
  • 43.18% min Protein by Dry Matter Basis
  • No Prescription Required
  • First 5 ingredients: Chicken, chicken broth, chicken liver, natural flavor, salt, guar gum
  • Guaranteed analysis: 9.50% crude protein, 7% crude fat, 0.75% crude fiber, 78% moisture, 0.10% taurine
  • Life stage: Senior, Adult, Kitten

High quality is the best way to describe this line up of soft cat food stews and pates. Versus many other foods for senior cats, I and Love and You’s ingredient list is the most premium, while at the same time being an easy-to-eat smooth pate.

Top Level Real Protein

Whole meats and organs like chicken, lamb, turkey, tuna, salmon, and liver make up the first couple of ingredients no matter which flavor you pick. You won’t find by-products and meals as a protein source here.

Note the cans may have a mix of whole food meats. For instance, while rabbit meat is the first ingredient, beef may be a secondary ingredient. A varied diet, just like nature intended.

No Filler

It contains no grains, rice, soy, corn, preservatives, flavors, or the artificial thickener carrageenan. All these are potentially irritating and could affect digestion.

Nutrients and Minerals

Senior cats will appreciate the omega 3 fatty acids and omega 6 fatty acids for brain function and decreasing inflammation. Flaxseeds and salmon oil contain healthy fats to keep your cat’s coat shiny and beautiful.

Potatoes and fruits and vegetables are a part in each recipe for the micronutrients and vitamins. Good intentions but probably unnecessary for your cat.

Watch Out for Allergies

You may want to be extra careful if your cat suffers from food allergies. Make sure to read all of the ingredients of whatever flavor you choose as there may be multiple protein sources.

Rating Breakdown:

  • Senior Cat Formulated: 7/10
  • Ingredient Quality: 9/10
  • Flavor Variety: 10/10
  • Price: 5/10
  • Overall Score: 7.75

What We Liked:

  • High quality, real protein
  • Easy to eat stews in gravy or pates
  • Omega fatty acids, flaxseed oil, salmon oil
  • No grains or fillers
  • Variety of flavors for picky eaters

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Price
  • Contains vegetables
  • Variations in quality according to some users

Best Budget Cat Food for Older Cats with Bad Teeth

Purina Pro Plan Prime Plus Senior 7+
8.25
  • Chkn, Chkn & Beef, Ocean Whitefish & Salmon, Salmon & Tuna, Turkey & Giblets Flavors
  • Soft Texture, Easily Digestible
  • 40.91% min Protein By Dry Matter Basis
  • No Prescription Required
  • First 5 ingredients: Chicken, chicken broth, chicken liver, natural flavor, salt, guar gum
  • Guaranteed analysis: 10% crude protein, 6% crude fat, 1.5% crude fiber, 78% moisture
  • Life stage: Senior

Purina Pro Plan is Purina’s line of up-market cat foods, to compete with smaller, more upscale boutique brands. You won’t find these at your supermarket or mega-mart, but rather, in dedicated pet shops or online.

So this is not cheap cat food, but still relatively affordable for its value.

This line tailors its recipes to target specific traits like aging, weight gain, and sensitive systems. If you are a loyal Purina fan and want to level up your cats food at a smart price, this is the place to start.

High Protein, Real Meat and Organs

Real meat and an organ meat like liver are the first two ingredient in all of the multitude of flavors, and the protein content is higher than others on this list and most wet cat foods at 10% crude protein.

The rest of the breakdown is 6% crude fat, 1.5% fiber, and 78% moisture.

Soft and Easy to Eat

Purina Pro P Senior 7+ wet food is a soft and palatable, surely one of the best cat foods for older cats with teeth problems.

It offers sustained benefits even after eating. For digestibility, there’s chicory root which acts as a prebiotic and improves gut overall gut health.

Vitamins, Minerals, Omegas

Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, common in senior formula cat food, are here in the form of fish oil and soybean oil. Together, they support a healthy coat and skin, joints, as well as control inflammation.

I’m not a fan of the by-products, carbohydrates and artificial flavors, though.

Overall

Parents of picky older cats of all types say that their cats enjoy this food. From older cats with few or no teeth, to those who were not eating and losing weight, they all eat it! And owners like the value for money.

Rating Breakdown:

  • Senior Cat Formulated: 10/10
  • Ingredient Quality: 7/10
  • Flavor Variety: 10/10
  • Price: 6/10
  • Overall Score: 8.25

What We Liked:

  • Price
  • Nutrition designed for healthy aging
  • Real meat in each recipe
  • Tender pate in gravy is easy to eat
  • Easy to eat stew in gravy
  • Variety of flavors

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Contains vegetables
  • Contains wheat gluten and soy protein

Best Dry Cat Food for Older Cats with Bad Teeth

Blue Buffalo Wilderness Grain Free Soft-Moist Cat Treats
8.25
  • Starts With Real Chicken And Salmon
  • Grain Free Cat Treats
  • Natural And Healthy
  • No Chicken (Or Poultry) By-product Meals
  • Contains One (1) 2-oz Bag Of Blue Wilderness Grain Free Soft-moist Cat Treats, Chicken & Salmon
  • First 5 ingredients: Chicken, chicken broth, chicken liver, natural flavor, salt, guar gum
  • Guaranteed analysis: 28% crude protein, 12% crude fat, 7% crude fiber, 9% moisture
  • Life stage: Senior

Blue Buffalo Basics Limited Ingredient Diet is uniquely one of the best dry cat foods for older cats with bad teeth because of its great digestibility.

As senior kitties eat less, they should be eating better and absorbing more. The way to do that is with single source protein, no irritating grains, and fiber.

Utilize More of Eaten Food

Turkey as the only protein promotes digestibility because it limits potentially irritating ingredients like common chicken or beef.

That’s why I’m happy to report Blue Buffalo Basics Limited Ingredient Diet does not contain grains, wheat, soy, dairy, eggs, by-products, artificial preservatives or flavors.

To further help digestion and promote a healthy GI, carbohydrates and fruits and vegetable are in the recipe too. Peas, potatoes, pumpkin, chicory root, kelp, and berries provide fiber and micronutrients.

These seem a bit like glamour ingredients that sound nice to humans, with no real use for cats. But if the intent here is extra fiber in this grain free cat food then it’s understandable.

Appropriate Protein, Moderate Fat Kibble

For senior cats who still love their dry kibble, this serves up 28% crude protein by volume from a single protein source: turkey.

28% is actually on the lower end of comparable kibble, but just right for senior cats who be at risk for Chronic Kidney Disease. There is also 12% crude fat, 7% crude fiber, and 9% moisture.

Nutrients Galore

What it does contain are omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids from fish oil and flaxseed oil to keep your cat’s skin and coat healthy.

Plus something called LifeSource Bits, the brand’s proprietary mix of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants specifically tailored for older cat’s immune system and management of oxidative stress.

Small Kibble for Jaws with Missing Teeth

Kibble is small and won’t fall out mouths with missing teeth, so cats can take their time eating.

Note that this kibble is not soft, this is probably not the best choice for cats with jaw or teeth pain. This product is best for older cats who can still chew, and maybe missing teeth.

Many buyers report this dry food has made all the difference in their cat’s vitality and coat.

Rating Breakdown:

  • Senior Cat Formulated: 7/10
  • Ingredient Quality: 7/10
  • Flavor Variety: 5/10
  • Price: 8/10
  • Overall Score: 6.75

What We Liked:

  • Real turkey as main ingredient
  • No filler
  • Senior cat-specific antioxidants, vitamins, minerals
  • Omega-3 and omega-6’s
  • Fiber and digestibility

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Price
  • Only one flavor

Best Cat Food for Dental Problems

Hill's Science Diet Dry, Oral Care
6.75
  • Chicken Flavor
  • Dental Care
  • 32.22% min Protein By Dry Matter Basis
  • No Prescription Required
  • First 5 ingredients: Chicken, Brown Rice, Corn Gluten Meal, Chicken Fat, Powdered Cellulose
  • Guaranteed analysis: 29% crude protein, 17.5% crude fat, 10% crude fiber, 10% moisture
  • Life stage: Adult

This dry food from Hills is one of the best cat foods for dental problems, because it provides tartar and plaque removing action via high quality protein.

Adequate Protein, Moderate Fat, with Right Nutrients

Real chicken is the first ingredient and it provides minimum 29% crude protein. It also has 17.5% crude fat, 10% crude fiber, and 10% moisture, making it the right ratio for what makes a quality dry cat food.

Omega fatty acids and vitamins for skin and coat, antioxidants and more fill out this complete health package.

I do wish this came in a grain free option, as I’m not thrilled with the brown rice, corn gluten meal, or wheat gluten in the ingredients. However, other oral care kibble (all kibble really) contain grains or carbs in some fashion.

In case kitty does not tolerate this product, try out Royal Canin Feline Oral Care Dry Cat Food!

Why It’s Unique

We love this as one of the best cats food for older cats with teeth problems as it is preventative dental care for older cats, working like a toothbrush at each bite.

The large size kibble have a unique fiber matrix that essentially scrubs teeth while chewing. Some users say it even freshens their cats’ breath!

But Not for All Cats

This dry, tooth-cleaning kibble is ideal for owners whose cats won’t let them brush their teeth, but may be difficult to eat for cats who are experiencing gum inflammation or tooth pain.

Although there is only one flavor available, users say their senior cats love the taste. Kibble size is larger than normal due to its brushing function, and there is both positive and negative feed back to this.

Some owners say their cats can’t properly chew this with bad teeth, yet others prefer it because the bigger pieces don’t fall out of cat’s mouths (who have teeth extracted)

Rating Breakdown:

  • Senior Cat Formulated: 7/10
  • Ingredient Quality: 6/10
  • Flavor Variety: 5/10
  • Price: 9/10
  • Overall Score: 6.75

What We Liked:

  • Designed to scrub and clean teeth
  • Nutrition designed for aging and tooth care
  • Omega 6’s, vitamin E, and minerals

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Contains vegetables
  • Contains wheat gluten and cornmeal

Looking for a Soft Dry Cat Food for Senior Cats?

I recommend Purina ONE Tender Selects Blend with its mix of soft tender meat pieces and small crunchy bits as a soft dry cat food for senior cats. This is the most popular pick in the soft dry cat food category.

Purina ONE Natural Dry Cat Food
7.5
  • One (1) 7 lb. Bag - Purina ONE Natural Dry Cat Food
  • SmartBlend of high-quality, Purina ONE cat food ingredients starts with real chicken
  • This digestive cat food contains four antioxidant sources for a strong immune system

This formula features real protein as the first ingredient, along with vitamins, omega-6’s, and essential minerals your cat needs to thrive.

Purina also includes prebiotic fiber to keep gut bacteria happy, which in turn influences digestion – another key point in how we rate a quality cat food for elderly cats

The crunchy pieces also work in a similar to the kibble in our best dental problem cat food – they scrub teeth and reduce plaque!

Rating Breakdown:

  • Dental/Senior Cat Formula: 8/10
  • Ingredient Quality: 6/10
  • Flavor Variety: 7/10
  • Price: 9/10
  • Overall Score: 7.5

Treats for Older Cats with Bad Teeth

My Maine Coon would never forgive me if I did not include a cat treat section here! Check out Blue Buffalo Wilderness Grain Free Soft-Moist Cat Treats for an awesome treat.

Blue Buffalo Wilderness Grain Free Soft-Moist Cat Treats
8.25
  • Starts With Real Chicken And Salmon
  • Grain Free Cat Treats
  • Natural And Healthy
  • No Chicken (Or Poultry) By-product Meals
  • Contains One (1) 2-oz Bag Of Blue Wilderness Grain Free Soft-moist Cat Treats, Chicken & Salmon

This brand is soft and chewy, made from real meat, with no by-products. It’s free of grains, artificial flavors or additives, and preservatives. You’ll no qualms about feeding this treat!

Compared to other popular cat treats, Blue Buffalo here contains more fat and less protein, but each treat is a similar number of calories (1.5). This is good – elderly cats do not require so much protein, but need adequate (or extra) calories.

Rating Breakdown:

  • Dental/Senior Cat Formula: 8/10
  • Ingredient Quality: 8/10
  • Flavor Variety: 9/10
  • Price: 8/10
  • Overall Score: 8.25

Food for Cats With Sore Teeth?

The best food for a cat with sore teeth is a high quality, great tasting, protein-packed wet food. Any of our top picks will do, especially Sheba Perfect Portions Cuts in Gravy or Royal Canin Aging 12+ Wet Cat Food!

That being said, sometimes an older cat with sore teeth wants their old dry food. In that case, I recommend adding soaking dry food in water to make it easier to eat.

A totally soft dry cat food or kibble does not exist on the market, which is why we do this.


My Experience with Cat Teeth and Mouth Problems

I need to start by saying I know how it feels to have your cat deal with dental and oral issues. While my Maine Coon cat is not old, she was diagnosed with gingiva and/or stomatitis.

cat stomatis gingiva
Poor Chelle

Note the large areas of red, inflamed gums? I can’t imagine the pain it was causing! During the time, she hardly did much eating and grooming.

Our veterinarian suggested extracting the teeth for a 100% chance of relief, but after much discussion, we ended up agreeing on gingivectomy, or removing the affected gum tissue.

Pre and post operation, you better believe I went looking for the softest, most moist and enticing cat foods for Chelle. And it was in this time frame where I learned about the foods above.


How to Choose a Cat Food for Old Cat with Teeth Problems

As cats age, they have changing needs. Maybe you need to switch them from a top entry litter box to an easy-to-access senior cat litter box. Or it could be diet and mouth related.

The nutritional needs of your older cat with bad teeth is the same as before, but with new considerations. Foods for them should tick the following boxes.

High Protein, Moderate Fat, Low Carb

All cats evolved from ancestors that were meat-eaters. The best cat food for older cats with teeth problems are rich in protein, decent fat, and low carbohydrates. As obligate carnivores, cats require:

  • 50% or more of their diet from high-quality protein
  • At least 30% of calories should be from fat
  • Less than 10% from carbs

Wet and Easy to Eat

Next, look for wet foods that are easy to eat. That means the food must be both soft and delicious to encourage eating.

Wet foods come in forms like a smooth pate, gravy, or thin slices, so find the one that best appeals to your cat. You can also add a delicious food topper or bone broth to the meal!

Dental disease is very common in older cats, which results in a troubled chewing and eating process. Compromised teeth can keep your cat from getting all of the nutrients of the food.

Older cats with dental problems may suffer from a loss of appetite. Loss of appetite can be caused by plenty of issues. Tooth sensitivity, loss of smell, and mouth pain are just a few.

Digestibility

For older cats, digestion can be an issue. For one, less activity also decreases gut motility, leading to constipation. Another reason is food becomes more difficult to digest fully.

That’s why digestible cats foods contain ingredients like fiber or probiotics that promote a health GI, more antioxidants, and vitamins. Potentially irritating preservatives, coloring, and gluten are also removed.

Dental disease is very common in older cats, which results in a troubled chewing and eating. Digestible protein ensures the food that is eaten is absorbed by the body in an efficient manner.

Nutritionally Dense

Last, but definitely not least, look for cat food that offers a big nutritional bang. Because your senior cat may be eating less or eating less, make each bite count.

Look for essential fatty acids like Omega 3’s and Omega 6’s for skin, coat, metabolism, and overall health. Ensure the essential amino acid taurine is present. Taurine deficiencies can lead to vision, heart, and digestion issues.

The best cat food for older cats with bad teeth have various vitamins – A, B, D, E, K – and minerals to ensure your elderly cat absorbs as much nutritional benefit from their food as possible, to stay youthful and free from disease.


What to Avoid in Cat Foods for Older Cats with Teeth Problems

Too Much Carbohydrates and Additives

Cats have no use for carbohydrates and an excess of it can lead to diarrhea or even diabetes. With lots of commercial cat food today, manufacturers bulk up the food with things like:

  • grains and wheat
  • rice and corn

They might appeal to cat owners, but it’s not great for cats. Look for grain-free cat foods for your senior cat. Note some recipes have carbohydrates as a fiber source. This is fine, but check that it is far near the start of the ingredient list.

Additives

Your elderly cat needs to get the most benefit from the food they do eat, especially if your cat experiences a loss of appetite.

The best cat foods for older cats with bad teeth deliver essential nutrition in every bite, not additives and unnecessary filler. Look out for things like:

  • fruits and vegetables
  • artificial colors and preservatives
  • butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), a possible carcinogen
  • butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), same

By-Products

What about by-products? And what are “by-products” anyway? Some authorities say to avoid by-products at all cost, but others say they’re perfectly fine. The entire debate depends on the definition of by-product.

Many cat foods do contain organ meat, which falls under the legal definition of by-product.

What most people are referring to when they say “by-product” though, are undigestible and unappetizing elements like hooves, hair, and horns that could find their way into inferior quality pet foods.

If your food lists by-products, read carefully to determine if they’re talking about high-protein organ meat or non-nutritious animal parts.


Dental Issues and Senior Cats

Senior cats can suffer from many dental issues that cause pain. Symptoms of dental disease include drooling, gum discoloration, bad breath, cracked or broken teeth, and difficulty eating.

If you notice any of these symptoms in your cat, it is important to take them to the veterinarian to get the necessary treatment. Below are some of the most common ailments of older cats.

Periodontal Disease

Periodontal disease means gum disease. Diseased gums can become inflamed. It can spread to the surrounding teeth and deep into the root of the tooth- ouch!

Gum disease can even cause a cat’s teeth to fall out. Fortunately, it’s avoidable. Prevention measures include scraping the teeth clean of tartar AKA brushing teeth! When the teeth are clean, the gums are more likely to stay clean.

Gingivitis

This is the inflammation of the gums and is the most common type of dental disease in cats. Plaque is a sticky film that forms on teeth and contains bacteria that, if not removed, can harden to tartar.

Plaque and Tooth Decay

A build-up of bacteria causes plaque and tooth decay on the teeth. If plaque isn’t removed, it can turn into tartar, a yellow or brown substance that forms on teeth and can only be removed by a veterinarian.

Tooth Resorption

Another common issue is tooth resorption. This is like an intense cavity eating away at your cat’s tooth. This condition may be caused by a lack of vitamin D.

Stomatitis

Stomatitis (inflammation in the mouth) is another common issue for older cats and can be very painful.

Watch out for signs like bright red gums. Even though your cat’s teeth may look healthy, the bright red gums may indicate inflammation and pain.

Nutrition and diligence can be your best allies in the fight against dental issues. You can spot dental issues early by looking out for signs like bad breath, tartar, and inflamed gums.


What to Feed a Toothless Cat?

But what if my cat ends up with no teeth? Sometimes severe dental disease calls for tooth-pulling or even a full extraction of all of the teeth.

Fortunately, cats missing teeth can still live quality lives. You’ll need canned food or softened kibble. A toothless cat must be able to gather the food in its mouth and swallow comfortably.

You may even find that your cat eats better without teeth after the painful dental issues have been taken care of! I recommend any of the above best cat foods for older cats with bad teeth.


How To Feed a Cat With Bad Teeth

There are several ways to help your senior cat with dental problems to ensure they get all the nutrients they need without struggling to eat. Here are some of them:

Give More Palatable Foods

If your cat has trouble eating their regular food, you can try giving them more palatable options. This can be either commercial dental cat food or home-prepared soft food.

One of the ways to make cat food more palatable at home is to add warm water or broth to make it softer. You can also add some wet food to dry kibble to increase the moisture content.

Smaller Pieces

If your cat struggles to eat larger pieces of food, you can try cutting their food into smaller pieces. This will make it easier for them to eat because small chunks are easier to swallow.

This is good to try when your cat absolutely loves their moist dry cat food, and won’t eat anything else. Break it up in small pieces, or pureed it with some water to make a shake!

Appetite Stimulants

Adult cats can go at up to a week without eating, but if your cat is really struggling to eat, you may want to consider using an appetite stimulant. This can help increase their appetite and make them more likely to eat.

Medication to Treat Dental Pain

If your cat is in pain due to their dental problems, you may consider giving them medication to help treat the pain. This can make it easier for them to eat and will also help them feel more comfortable.

See Your Veterinarian

The most important thing to do if you have a cat with bad teeth is to see your veterinarian.

They can help you develop a plan to care for your cat’s teeth and recommend what to feed them to ensure they get all the nutrients they need.


Know This About Cat Dental Care

Don’t let the above bum you out. It’s important to realize cat dental care is about prevention and catching problems before they result in advanced dental disease in old age. Here are a few important things to keep in mind about caring for your cat’s teeth.

  • Brush your cat’s teeth! When it comes to gum and teeth health, prevention is the best possible route. And brushing is the most impactful you can do for your cat’s oral health.
  • Don’t forget to use toothpaste formulated for cats, as humans products be toxic.
  • Dry cat food can actually clean your cat’s teeth. When scrubbed of tartar, cats are less likely to develop inflamed gums and other dental issues.
  • Look into dental treats if your cat is a wet food lover. These tasty treats function like dry food and can remove plaque and tartar.
  • During regular veterinary check-ups, pay attention to their advice on your cat’s teeth. Cats who develop gingivitis even with proper care should be tested further to rule out more serious underlying conditions.

Frequently Asked Questions

What can I feed my cat with teeth problems?

When you’re choosing the best cat food for older cats with bad teeth, two elements stand out: texture and nutritional content.

Cats with teeth problems may experience pain that keeps them from chewing, biting, or tearing food. Look for wet cat foods like pate, stew, or slivers in gravy that your cat can lick or easily pick up and swallow without teeth.

The nutritional content of the food is important because they may eat less due to loss of appetite, and need to get as much nutrition as possible out of the food they do eat.

Look for cat food with a high level of meat-based protein, a moderate level of fats, and a low level of carbohydrates. Avoid fillers and non-nutritious additives.

The most important thing when feeding a cat with dental problems is ensuring that whatever you feed them is soft. For this reason, you will need to avoid any hard kibble or crunchy treats.

Soft Wet Food: The best option is to feed your cat soft wet food. Wet food is easier to eat and has abundant moisture. It is also generally more nutritious than dry food, with less carbohydrate filler.

Pouch Food: If soft commercial wet cat food is still too hard for your cat to eat, you can try various pouch foods or semi-wet cat foods. They come in a variety of textures and can be more tasty to cats.

Liquid Food: Liquid food for cats can also be found in some stores or with your veterinarian’s recommendation. These are generally not for long term use, as they lack a good amount of protein. The best thing about liquid food is that it was especially for sick or recovering kitties, so for cats with few teeth or cats with no teeth, so it’s worth considering.

You can also DIY and add water to wet food or soft dry cat food to create your cat’s favorite mix, but more liquid and softer.

What to feed senior cats with no teeth?

Cats missing teeth can still live quality lives. Look for wet, canned food or softened kibble. A toothless cat must be able to gather the food in its mouth and swallow comfortably.

Foods in gravy are a good option because toothless cats can lick the gravy.

Some textured wet foods, like slivers in gravy or stew in gravy, are edible without teeth as well. Your toothless cat may even eat a pate or softened kibble.

Try a variety of textures and see which option your toothless cat eats the most of.

Which is better for a cat’s teeth wet or dry food?

Older cats and cats with dental problems may benefit from nutritionally dense wet cat food to compensate for a loss of appetite, difficulty eating, or missing teeth.

Younger cats can benefit from dry cat food because it scrapes the tartar off of the teeth. However, once a cat had aged or developed dental issues, it is important to reassess the cat’s food needs.

How helpful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 5 / 5. Vote count: 1

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Shop Today's Deals on Cat Food!

From Our #1 Ranked Online Pet Store

  • 365 day returns
  • 24/7 support
  • Discounts on new customers, Autoship, 1-3 day delivery & more!

Shop Today's Specials on Cat Food!

From Our #1 Ranked Online Pet Store

  • 365 day returns
  • 24/7 support
  • Ongoing discounts for new customers, Autoship, 1-3 day delivery & more!